DSTRESS - 1.877.476.7734A PLACE TO CALL

FOR THOSE WITH THE COURAGE TO ANSWER OUR NATION’S CALL

From the everyday stressors of life to the stressors related to combat, stress can affect even the strongest Marine. The DSTRESS Line was developed by the Corps to provide professional, anonymous counseling for Marines, their families and loved ones when it’s needed most. Call today to speak with one of your own.

1-877-476-7734

http://dstressline.com/

Laura Texier, BSW
Prevention & Education Specialist
Installation Suicide Prevention Coordinator
(619) 524-1200
San Diego, CA 92140

(619) 725-6226
(619) 725-6233 Fax

Hours
Monday – Friday
0730 – 1600

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - 1-800-273-TALK (8255)ARE YOU IN CRISIS?

Please call 1-800-273-TALK

Are you feeling desperate, alone or hopeless? Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), a free, 24-hour hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. Your call will be routed to the nearest crisis center to you.

  • Call for yourself or someone you care about
  • Free and confidential
  • A network of more than 140 crisis centers nationwide
  • Available 24/7

1-800-273-TALK

http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/


NEVER LEAVE A MARINE BEHIND

ON THE BATTLEFIELD OR AT HOME

SUICIDE DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE. EVERYONE IS AT RISK.

Suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death in the Marine Corps. The Marine Corps views suicide prevention as the responsibility of the entire Marine Corps community and it is the duty of Marines, family members, and friends to encourage those who are troubled to seek help.

WHAT ARE THE WARNING SIGNS?

  • Talking about Dying
  • Preparing to Die (giving away belongings, saying goodbye to family and friends)
  • Looking for Ways to Die
  • Change in Personality or Emotions, Behaviors, Sleep Patterns, or Eating Habits
  • Low Self-Esteem
  • No Hope for the Future

WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS?

  • Relationship problems
  • Legal or Work Problems
  • Family History of Suicide
  • Alcohol or drug use
  • History of Physical or Sexual Abuse
  • Social Isolation
  • Physical illness
  • Depression
  • Past Suicide Attempt
  • History of Violence or Hostility
  • Unwillingness to seek help
  • Access to means to kill oneself

WHAT CAN I DO?

  • Ask open-ended questions, i.e., “How are things going?”
  • Lend support/Be Willing to Listen
  • Share your Concern for their Well-being
  • Remove any weapons, pill, or rope
  • Do Not Leave the Marine Alone
  • Seek Professional Help Right Away

The most important thing to do if you are concerned or recognize warning signs is to TAKE ACTION. If a buddy is suicidal you may not get a second chance to save the Marine’s life.


GET HELP NOW

Chain of Command
Please see your appointed Suicide Prevention Officer for your Marine unit.

National Suicide Prevention Hotline
1-800-273-TALK (8255)

National Hopeline Network
1-800-Suicide
1-800-784-2433
http://www.hopeline.com/

Military OneSource
1-800-342-9647
https://www.militaryonesource.com/

DCoE Outreach Call Center
1-866-966-1020

HQMC Suicide Prevention
http://www.manpower.usmc.mil

Leaders Guide for Managing Marines in Distress
http://www.usmc-mccs.org/leadersguide/

Marine Corps Suicide Prevention Program (MRS)
Headquarters United States Marine Corps
3280 Russell Rd. Quantico, VA 22134


SUICIDE PREVENTION BRIEF

Designed to meet three objectives:

  • Define terms related to suicide and teach facts about suicide
  • Be able to recognize signs and symptoms of suicidal persons
  • Discussion of R.A.C.E.

R.A.C.E. SUICIDE ALERT

Recognize distress in your Marine
Note changes in personality, emotions or behavior.

Ask your Marine
Calmly question and if necessary ask directly, “Are you thinking about killing yourself?”

Care for your Marine
Don’t judge, control situation peacefully and keep everyone safe.

Escort your Marine
Stay with your buddy and escort to chain of command chaplain, medical, or behavioral health professional.